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Posts Tagged ‘hotel’

The Basic Issues with Hotels in Asia

In Asia Travel, Travel Tips on November 14, 2008 at 8:15 am

Hotel rooms in Asia hotels

Hotel rooms in Asia hotels

The title might sound scary a bit, but of course, we aren’t going to discuss about any common or bad issues. Neither the “bare minimum” like a clean room, decent shower or comfortable bed because you could easily find these basic facilities in most of the hotels in Asia already, nor negative experiences from other travelers.

 

A lot of travel experiences can tell that no two hotels are alike. Even those two hotels came from the same worldwide luxury hotels chain. What may be regarded as a 5-star hotel in one country, may qualify as 3-star (or less) in another. Hotels, though catering to tourists, will likely adhere to local beliefs and customs. To avoid having the wrong expectations, here is some basic issues that travelers should expect from hotels of various countries in Asia.

Japan: The land of the Samurai has long been known for its costly real estate and limited land availability, so don’t expect hotel rooms to be generous in size. Head room will be tight, especially for Europeans and Americans. Be cautious of door ledges and protect your head as you enter and leave the room and/or bathroom. Showering in Tokyo may be a cramped experience since elbowing and banging into walls, shelf, shower head, etc. is a common occurrence. And watch out for the buttons on the toilet; bidets are used throughout Japan, and if you’re unfamiliar with them, you may be in for a surprise.

Beds are relatively hard and tend to be smaller than North American beds. And the pillows are sometimes filled with soba-seed, or buckwheat -both are supposedly good for your health and provide good support for your neck.

Other than those small differences, everything else is great. Japanese hotel staffs are exceedingly polite and very helpful.

India: Exotic, glamorous and elegant. These are some of the keywords fitted to describe hotel rooms in India. For the price of an average 3-star room in other countries, you can probably snatch a 4 or 5 star room in India. Rooms are often spacious and lavishly decorated to showcase local lifestyle and culture. You may also find many colonial-styled hotel rooms (especially in older hotels) due to the country’s long history under British rule. However, do not drink the tap water. Clean water supplies continue to be an issue in India.

Thailand: You’ll feel like you are getting the biggest bang for your buck staying at hotels in Thailand; famous for its vast choice of fantastic, relatively inexpensive luxury hotels, like Bangkok’s Mandarin Oriental or Peninsula hotels, Chiang Mai’s Shangri-La and Pattaya’s Sheraton Resort – just to name a fine few. Expect to be treated like royalty-usually with a glass of juice or tea at reception, flowers on the bed, a welcome fruit basket and top-rated amenities awaiting your arrival. Water coming out from the tap could be a little off-color (yellowish or brownish), especially when traveling further away from Bangkok (– but still perfectly safe to use). Another problem, in smaller hotels, is the lack of insulation material in the room construction resulting in noisy rooms. Unless staying really high up, there is a good chance of hearing the traffic and city noises, not to mention noises within the hotel itself. It’s a good idea to bring earplugs just in case. And we suggest you don’t dive into the bed. Thai beds tend to be firmer than those found in hotels elsewhere, and a swan dive onto the sheets could leave you breathless.

Australia: The land down under is not as wild and “outback” as you may think. Sure, the country is made up of deadly critters and strange looking animals, but hotel rooms here are as pleasant as any other country in the world. Rooms are similar to North American hotels and are generally comfortable and well-equipped with the necessary amenities. One slight problem you may encounter, however, is water shortage. In some parts of Australia (mostly in the south), water restrictions laws may be applied due to drought and extreme dry weather, thus restricting shower and bath usage. Otherwise, enjoy the unique geography and myriad of activities this country has to offer. Just try not to waste too much water while you’re there.

Please bear in mind that before travelling overseas, it’s better to prepare and welcome to accept different customs and points of etiquette. Either with local foods, cultures or even hotel facilities and services. Especially when you are travelling to Asia destinations where vast and variety of lifestyles are embedded in every segment of each local community.